THE LAWS OF TENNIS

MEMORANDUM

THE LAWS OF TENNIS IN THE UNITED STATES

THE UNITED STATES COURT TENNIS ASSOCIATION

2000

 

United States Court Tennis Association

939 Boylston St.

Boston, MA 02115

 

THE LAWS OF TENNIS

2000

 

At the millennium the Laws of Tennis in America, first adopted in 1934 and amended in 1979, have been revised and updated with input from all of the member clubs of the United States Court Tennis Association. As before we have not followed the rules of the Tennis & Rackets Association of Great Britain verbatim, although where practical we have made changes to conform with rules around the world. We have added a section defining amateur status in this country, as well as a compendium of local rules as submitted by each of our member clubs. Particular thanks go to George Wharton, Newport, and Andrew Kinzler, Philadelphia, for their assistance.

 

Richard L. Brickley, Jr.

Tennis & Racquet Club

Boston – Chairman

 

Samuel F. Abernethy

Racquet and Tennis Club

New York

 

Thomas M. Greevy, Jr.

Head Professional

Tuxedo Club

Tuxedo

 

Edwin J. Wheeler

Tuxedo Club

Tuxedo

 

Gregory Van Schaack

Tuxedo Club

Tuxedo

 

1979 Committee

Clarence C. Pell, Chairman

Robert Grant, Jr.

Richard D. Sears III

 

1934 Committee

John C. Bell, Jr., Chairman

Channing Frothingham

William Rand

GLOSSARY OF TENNIS TERMS

GLOSSARY OF TENNIS TERMS

(See also the Definitions contained in Rule 1 of the Laws.)

 

Advantage. See rule 14.

All the Walls. Also called Touch No Walls, see rule 24(g).

At Rest. A ball that has stopped moving usually on a battery wall in front of an opening. The ball is deemed to have entered that opening.

Attack. See rule 1. Chase, attacking a.

Back Wall. See rule 1.

Bandeau. See rule 1.

Bar the Openings. See rule 24(a).

Bar the Winning Openings. See rule 24(b).

Batteries. The portions of wall between the openings and the floor.

Better. See rules 1 and 8.

Bisque. See rules 1 and 22.

Boast. A return that is struck against the main wall (presumably derived from Bosse). Originally the word appears to have been used only when it was intended that the ball should enter the dedans; but it is now used more widely, and occasionally even for returns struck against walls other than the main wall.

Boasted Force. A boast that drops in a winning opening. The term is usually employed only for a force to the dedans.

Bobble Service. A slow serve that bounces frequently on the service penthouse and that should drop near the grill wall.

Boomerang Service. A service that strikes the service penthouse, the back penthouse and then the service penthouse again, falling onto the service floor. If served correctly, it falls very close and parallel to the back penthouse wall.

Carrying the Ball. Not cleanly and definitely releasing the ball during a stroke.

Chase. See rule 1.

Coup De Breche. A straight force that drops in the dedans near to one of its outer edges.

Coup De Cabasse. A return that drops in the dedans after first striking the side penthouse wall between the last gallery and the dedans wall (called after a French Professional of that name who played this difficult stroke).

Coup De Chandelle. A lofted return that drops or (more usually) falls in the dedans.

Coup D’Orleans. A return that is struck against the service wall and drops in the dedans direct (called after Philippe Egalite, Duc D’Orleans, who invented or practiced this stroke).

Coup De Temps. The stroke usually attempted off the back wall when the ball is too near to the wall and floor for an ordinary return to be made. The stroke is commenced before the ball reaches the wall so that immediately it leaves it; the stroke can be completed with the minimum amount of further movement and acceleration of the racquet.

Court. See rule 1.

Cramped Odds. Handicaps that prohibit certain strokes or services. See rule 23.

Dead. See rule 1.

Dedans. See rule 1.

Defend. See rule 1. Chase, defending a.

Deuce. See rule 14.

Door. See rules 1 (Gallery) and 8.

Double. See rule 1.

Doubles. See rule 20.

Drop. See rule 1.

Drop Service. A high service, delivered from near the main wall, that should drop near to the grille wall.

Du Tout. The score of a player who requires one stroke to win the set.

Enter a Gallery or an Opening. See rule 1.

Fall. See rule 1.

Fault. See rule 6.

Fault-Caller. See rule 19(c).

Fifteen. See rule 14.

First Gallery. See rules 1 (Gallery) and 7.

First Stroke. The return of the service.

Fly Net. Not used in most modern courts. In some old courts there was a fly net high up in each of the four corners. A ball striking the fly net was not out of court.

Force. A stroke that drops into an opening, usually a winning opening. The term is not used for a slow lofted return. It is customary not to force for the dedans from the hazard side from in front of the service line, except when receiving serve.

Forty. See rule 14. Originally this score was forty-five, but was subsequently called forty for the sake of brevity.

Four Handed Game. See rule 20.

Gallery. See rule 1.

Gallery Lines. Chase lines that correspond to galleries (see rules 7 and 8).

Gallery Net. The net attached to a gallery post to separate a gallery from the one next to it.

Gallery Post. See rule 1.

Game. See rule 14.

Giraffe Service. A high underhand service delivered from near the side penthouse. (After dropping on the service penthouse the ball should drop on the floor near to the fault line and to the grille wall.)

Good Return. See rule 1 (Return).

Good Service. See rule 6.

Grille. See rule 1.

Grille Penthouse. The penthouse above the grille wall.

Grille Wall. See rule 1.

Half a Yard. See rule 7.

Half-Bisque. See rule 23.

Half-Court Lint;. See rule 1.

Half Odds. See rule 20.

Hazard Chase. See rule 1.

Hazard Court. See rule 1.

Hazard Side. See rule 1.

Joues. The inner vertical walls of the dedans, grilles, winning gallery and last gallery. A ball in touching a joue is not thereby deemed to have entered an opening (see rule 1).

Last Gallery. See rules 1 (Gallery) and 7.

Ledge. See rule 1.

Let. See rules 16, 19 and 20.

Line. The cord that supports the net.

Line, Chase the. See rule 1.

Love. The score of a player who has not yet won a stroke in the game or a game in the set in question.

Love Game. A game won by a player in which his opponent does not score a stroke.

Love Set. A set won by a player by winning six successive games.

Lune. A winning opening that was found in some old courts. There was no standard size, shape or position for lunes, but they were usually placed above the dedans and grille penthouse.

Net Cord. The cord that supports the net.

Net Post. See rule 1.

Nick. See rule 1.

Odds. Any form ofhandicap is called odds. See rules 21 through 24.

Opening. Entering an. See rule 1.

Out of Court. See rule 1.

Pass Court. See rule 1.

Pass Line. (no longer used. See rule 1, Fault Line)

Passing the Net. See rule 1.

Penthouse. The sloping roof of the dedans, galleries and grille, extending along three sides of the court.

Pique Service. The server should stand near to the main wall and to the 2nd gallery line. He serves overhead on to the service penthouse and as near as possible to the service line. After striking the service wall the ball should drop near to the grille wall and the fault line. Also called the pound service.

Play Line. The wood trim or the line painted on the walls to mark the upper limits of the area prepared for play (see rule 1, Out of Court).

Poop Service. A high arching service delivered from near the main wall that lands on the service penthouse, and then drops very close to the grille wall.

Post. See Net Post and Gallery Post, rule 1.

Pound Service. See Pique Service.

Railroad Service. An overhead reverse twist service delivered by the server standing near the wall between the second gallery line and the dedans wall. (The ball must touch the penthouse squarely, at least once.

Referee. See rule 18.

Rest. See rule 1.

Rough. The side of the racquet on which the knots are.

Second Gallery. See rules 1 (Gallery) and 7.

Service. See rule 1.

Service Court. See rule 1.

Service Line. See rule 1.

Service Penthouse. See rule 1.

Service Side. See rule 1.

Service Wall. See rule 1.

Set. See rule 15. A match is won by the player who first wins an agreed number of sets. Each set is a separate unit and no game won in one set has any effect on another set.

Side Penthouse. See rule 1.

Side Wall. See rule 1.

Side Wall Service. Delivered from near the side penthouse wall. The ball usually touches the service wall before the service penthouse, but need not do so. The twist on it should be such that it clings to the grille wall after dropping.

Smooth. The side of the racquet on which is the string with no knots.

Striker. See rule 1.

Striker-Out. See rule 1.

Stroke. See rules 13 and 14.

Tambour. The projection on the main wall near the grille. The whole of the projection should be called the tambour, though the term is more commonly applied to that part of it that is at an angle to the main wall. (Also called the face of the tambour.)

Thirty. See rule 14.

Three-Handed Game. See rule 19.

Touch no Walls. See rule 24(g).

Touch no Side Walls. See rule 24(t).

Tray. See rule l.

Twist Service. An underhand service delivered from near the side penthouse wall. The ball does not usually touch the service wall. The twist on it should be such that, after striking the grille wall, it comes back towards the side wall.

Uneven Odds. See rule 1.

Wing Net. A net put up in some courts for the protection of the marker in front of the net post and attached to the underside of the service penthouse.

Winning Gallery. See rule 1.

Winning Openings. See rule 1.

Worse. See rule l.

Yard. See rule 7.

THE LAWS OF TENNIS

THE LAWS OF TENNIS

1. DEFINITIONS.

In these laws the following words have the following meanings:
Back Walls. The walls between the service wall and the mainwall.

Bandeau. The strip of wall immediately below a penthouse, usually made of the same material as the penthouse.

Better. One chase is better than another if it is made on the same side of the court and further from the net (rule 8). In marking chases, better means that the ball makes a chase:
(a) further from the net than the line mentioned, and
(b) nearer to that line than to any other yard or gallery line (rule 8b).

Bisque. One stroke in a set conceded to an opponent (rule 22).

Chase. A chase is made whenever the ball falls in the hazard court, or anywhere on the service side, or enters a gallery, except the winning gallery, dedans or grille (rule8).
· attacking a. When a chase is being played for, the opponent of the player who made the chase is said to be attacking the chase (rules 11 and 12).
· calling a. The marker calls a chase when he states the chase that is to be played for.
· defending a. When a chase is being played for, the player who made the chase is said to be defending the chase (rule 11).
· lines. The lines marked on the floor to enable the marker to mark chases are called chase lines or chases (rule 8).
· marking a. The marker marks a chase when that chase is made.
· off. See rule 11b.
· the line. See line, Chase the.

Court. The enclosure in which the game is played. The court is divided by the net into two sides, the service side and the hazard side (q.v.). See plan at front.

Dead. A ball is said to be dead when it ceases to be in play. (See rule 18b.)

Dedans. The winning opening at the back of the service side.

Dedans Wall. The back wall on the service side.

Double Hit. When the ball has been struck twice by the racquet during the same stroke.

Drop. A ball is said to drop when, after passing the net, it first touches the -floor, or enters an opening without having previously touched from the floor.

Enter a Gallery or Other Opening. See Opening, Entering an.

Fall. A ball is said to fall when, after having dropped, it touches the floor again or enters an opening.

Fault Line. The line on the floor nearest the grille and extending from the service line to the grille wall, up the grille wall and across the penthouse roof to the grille penthouse wall (See Pass Line).

Gallery. An opening below the penthouse opposite to the main wall. The galleries are named as follows, starting from the net:
(a) on the service side, the line, the first gallery, the door, the second gallery, the last gallery;
(b) on the hazard side, the line, the first gallery, the door, the second gallery, the winning gallery.

Gallery Post. The post between two galleries is considered to be part of the gallery nearer the net. The part of a gallery net that is attached to and surrounds a gallery post is part of that post.

Good Return. See Return.

Grille. The opening in the grille wall.

Grille Penthouse. That part of the penthouse on the hazard side between the main wall and the service wall.

Grille Wall. The back wall on the hazard side.

Half-Court Line. The line that bisects the floor between the main wall and the side wall.

Hazard Chase or Hazard Side Chase. A chase made on the hazard side of the court.

Hazard Court. The floor on the hazard side court the net up to, but not including the service line.

Hazard Side. The side of the court on the left of the net when facing the main wall.

In Play. A ball served is in play until:
(a) the service becomes a fault, or
(b) either player fails to make a good return, or
(c) a let is called by marker or referee, or
(d) a chase is made by one player, or
(e) a chase is won or lost.

Ledge. The horizontal surface of a wall that forms An opening.

Line, Chase the, is chase at the line of the net. On the floor it is the area between the net and the next marked chase. The line gallery is that between the net cord and the post next to it.

Main Wall. The wall that has no penthouse.

Net Post. The post supporting the net under the penthouse.

Nick. The junction of the wall and the floor, or a return when the ball, as it drops or falls, touches the wall and the floor simultaneously.

Not Up. When the ball falls on the floor just before being struck.

Opening. Any gallery or winning opening.

Opening, Entering an. A ball enters an opening when a good return or service:
(a) touches the post (see Gallery Post), net, or tray of that opening, or
(b) touches anything lying in that opening (if an article is lying in an opening any part of it, even if outside, is considered to be in that opening), or
(c) comes to rest in or on the ledge of that opening, or
(d) in the case of the grille or dedans touches the woodwork at the back of the framing.

Out of Court. A ball is out of court if it touches any part of:
(a) the play line.
(b) the walls above the area prepared for play.
(c) the roof or roof beams or girders or lighting equipment.

Pass Court. The part of the floor on the hazard side that lies between the main wall, the grille wall, the fault (or pass) line, but not including that line, and the service line including that line.

Pass Line. (No longer used – See Fault Line).

Passing the Net. The ball passes the net when it crosses over it between the net-post and the main wall, or when it crosses the line bisecting the side penthouse.

Rally or Rest. A stroke or series of strokes, commencing when the ball is served and terminating when the ball is dead.

Return, or Return of the Ball in Play. The return of the ball is good if:
(a) it is struck before it falls, and
(b) it is struck so that it passes the net without having previously touched the floor or anything lying on the floor, or the net post, or any gallery post or without having entered an opening, and
(c) it has not touched any player or anything he wears or carries except his racquet in the act of striking the ball, and
(d) it does not go out of court, and
(e) it is struck definitely and only once (and not carried) and
(f) It is not on the side of the net opposed to the player when he strikes it, and
(g) in Courts where there is a wing net between the net post and the net, it does not touch the wing net before passing the net.
Except that such a return is not good if:
(h) the player touches the net in any manner before striking the ball (if he accidentally touches the net after striking the ball there is no penalty), or
(i) the ball, after passing the net, comes back and drops on the side from which it was played (even if it touches the net before so dropping the return is not good).

Service. The method of starting a rally or rest.

Service Court. The part of the floor on the hazard side that lies between the side wall, the grille wall, the fault line and the service line (including those two lines).

Service Line or Winning Gallery Line. The line which is nearest and parallel to the grille wall.

Service Penthouse. That part of the side penthouse which is on the hazard side of the court, including the line that bisects the side penthouse.

Service Side. The side of the court on the right of the net when facing the main wall.

Service Wall. The wall above the side penthouse.

Side Penthouse. The penthouse above the galleries, up to its junction with the other penthouses.

Side Penthouse Wall. The wall below the side penthouse.

Striker. The player who last struck the ball.

Striker-Out. The player who is to take the service.

Tray. The inner part of the bottom of an opening behind the ledge, usually made of wood.

Uneven Odds. When points given and or received are not the same in each game, and/or when one or more bisques or half-bisques are given.

Winning Gallery. The last gallery on the hazard side.

Winning Openings. The dedans, the grille, and the winning gallery.

Worse. One chase is worse than same side of the court and nearer to the net (rule 8). In marking chases, worse means that the ball makes a chase:
(a) nearer to the net than the line mentioned, and
(b) nearer to that line than to any other yard or gallery line (rule 8b).

2. NET.

The height of the net above the level of the floor shall be:
(a) at the center, 3 feet, and
(b) at the main wall and below the edge of the penthouse, 5 feet.

3. BALLS.

The balls shall be not less than 2-7/16 inches and not more than 2-9/16 inches in diameter, including the cover. They shall be not less than 2-3/8 ounces and not more than 2-5/8 ounces in weight. (Approved by the Board of the USCTA January 25, 1973). Preference is for the heavier range to aid in uniformity.

4. RACQUETS.

Racquet frames must be made of wood and designed for the game of tennis and approved by this Association.

5. SIDES.

(a) The choice of sides at the beginning of a match is decided by spin of a racquet.
(b) Subsequently the players change sides only when two chases have been scored, or when one player is at forty or advantage and one chase has been scored.
(c) If the players change sides before they should have done so, or do not change sides when they should, any strokes so played on the wrong side shall be scored, and play shall continue as if no mistake had been made, except that any chase scored in excess of the proper number shall be annulled if the mistake is discovered before that chase has been played for (rule 12).

6. SERVICE.

The service is always given by the player who is on the service side. A service is good if it is not a fault.

(1) A service is a fault:
(a) if the server stands on or beyond the second gallery line, or
(b) if the server misses the ball or does not definitely strike it, or strikes it more than once, or
(c) if the ball served, before touching the side penthouse touches anything except the service wall (if the ball touches the edge of the penthouse before touching anything else it is a fault), or
(d) if the ball served does not touch the service penthouse (if the ball, after striking the service wall in dropping touches the edge of the service penthouse, it is considered to have touched the penthouse), or
(e) if the ball served goes out of court, or
(f) if the ball served drops anywhere except in the service court or crosses the fault line on the penthouse roof (formerly known as the pass line).
A service that has become a fault may not be returned, but one that would become a fault if allowed to drop to the floor, may be volleyed by the striker-out regardless of the position of the striker-out’s feet. If striker-out is not ready for a service and does not attempt to take it, a let (see rules 16 and 18) shall be allowed.

(2) A serve that does not touch the penthouse after the service line (except as in rule 1c) is a fault.

7. CHASE LINES, HOW MARKED.

Chase lines are marked on the floor as follows:

Service Side.
Half-a-yard,
One yard,
One and two,
Two,
and so on up to six, then
Half-a-yard worse than six,
The last gallery,
Half-a-yard worse than the last gallery,
A yard worse than the last gallery,
One yard worse and the second gallery,
The second gallery,
The second gallery and the door,
The door,
The door and the first gallery,
The first gallery,
The first gallery and the line.

Hazard Side. The same as on the service side, except that all chases between two and the second gallery are omitted and the last or second gallery are omitted and the last or winning gallery line is called the service line.

8. CHASES, HOW MADE.

(a) When the ball enters a gallery (except the winning gallery or dedans or grille) or falls on the floor (unless it falls in the service court or in the pass court) it makes a chase at the gallery it enters or at the line on which it falls.
(b) When it falls between two lines it makes a chase better or worse than the yard line or the gallery line nearest to the spot where it fell, except that:
(1) it makes chase better than half a yard when it so falls, and
(2) when it falls better or worse than the line “a yard worse than the last gallery” the chase is called “nearly a yard” or “more than a yard worse than the last gallery,” and
(3) when it falls nearer to the net than to the first gallery line it makes chase the line, and
(4) when it drops or falls in the net on the side opposed to the striker, or drops on the side opposed to the striker and then falls on the side from which it was struck it makes chase the line on the side opposed to the striker, and
(5) when it drops or falls on another ball on the floor it makes a chase as if it had fallen where that other ball was lying.

9. CHASE, HOW AND WHEN SCORED.

(a) When no chase is being played for, a chase is scored when made in accordance with rule 8.
(b) When a chase is scored, the score in strokes is unaltered.

10. CHASES, WHEN PLAYED FOR.

When two chases have been scored, or when one player is at forty or advantage and one chase has been scored, the players change sides and the chase or chases in the order in which they were made are immediately played for. A chase is played for once only, unless there is a let (rule 16).

11. CHASES, HOW WON OR LOST.

When a chase is being played for,
(a) the player attacking the chase loses it if
(1) he serves two consecutive faults, or
(2) he does not make a good return, or
(3) he makes a chase worse than the one being played for;
(b) it is chase off when the player attacking the chase makes it equal to the one being played for; (when it is chase off the chase is annulled and the score is unaltered.)
(c) the player attacking the chase wins it if
(1) his opponent serves two consecutive faults, or
(2) his opponent does not make a good return (unless the player attacking the chase makes a chase worse than or equal to the one being played for, in which case paragraph (a) or (b) of this rule applies), or
(3) he makes a chase better than the one being played for.

12. ERRORS REGARDING CHASES.

(a) Either player may appeal regarding the marking of a chase (rule 18a).
(b) If the chase to be played for is wrongly called by the marker, the server or striker-out may appeal before the service is delivered.

If there is no such appeal or if the call is not changed by the marker or referee, the chase played for shall be that called by the marker immediately before the service delivered, notwithstanding that this may be different from that marked when the chase was scored.

(c) If there has been any misunderstanding as to what chase the marker called, the rally or rest as played shall stand or a let (rules 16 and 18) may be allowed, whichever the marker or the referee considers equitable in view of all the circumstances.
(d) If, through any mistake, at the end of a game there is a chase that has been scored and not played for, that chase is annulled.
(e) If the players change sides when too few or too many chases have been made, see rule 5.

13. STROKES, HOW WON.

A player wins a stroke:
(a) if he wins a chase (rule 11), or
(b) if his opponent loses a chase (rule 11), or
(c) if a return or a good service played by him enters a winning opening or falls in the service court, or
(d) if when no chase is being played for and provided that no chase is made, his opponent does not make a good return, or
(e) if his opponent serves two consecutive faults (rule 6).

14. STROKES AND GAMES, HOW SCORED.

In each game, when either player wins his first stroke his score is called fifteen; when he wins his second stroke, thirty; when he wins his third stroke, forty; and when he wins his fourth stroke, he wins the game, except as below.
When both players have won three strokes, and score is called deuce, and it is called advantage to the player who then wins the next stroke.
If the player who is at advantage wins the next stroke, he wins the game; if he loses it, the score is again called deuce, and so on until the player who is at advantage wins a stroke and the game.

15. SETS, HOW WON.

The player who first wins 6 games in a set wins it.

16. LET.

In the case of a let:
(a) the rest to which it refers counts for nothing; and if a chase was being played for, it is then played for again, and if there was a previous fault, it is not annulled.
(b) if a chase was being played for, it is then played for again, and
(c) if there was a previous fault, it is not annulled.

17. CONTINUOUS PLAY

(a) After the first service has been delivered, play shall be continuous and, having regard to all the circumstances, reasonably expeditious unless the referee (or, if none, the marker) decides otherwise.
(b) No player may leave the court without the express permission of the referee (or, if none, the marker) and then only for a good reason and for the shortest possible time.
(c) The referee (or, if none, the marker) has the power:
(1) To order any player who has left the court, with or without permission under b. above, to return and play on; and
(2) To order any player to leave the court or (as the case may be) to remain off the court; and
(3) To order any player to resume
(4) To give warnings and to award the match, as he, in his absolute discretion taking account of all the circumstances, thinks fit, to any player, and in the case of such an award, whether or not he has previously given a warning to the player in question under this paragraph (4).
(d) Any player shall have the right at any time to appeal to the referee (or, if none, the marker) if he considers that either a or b above is being or has been breached.

18. REFEREE.

(a) Either player may appeal to the referee (whose decision is final) about any point subject to the following:
(1) the server shall not, after delivering a service, appeal about any point prior to that service, and
(2) the striker-out shall not, after attempting to take a service, appeal about any point prior to that service.
(b) When the marker calls not up or in any way indicates that a rally or rest has terminated, the ball is dead. If the referee’s decision is that the rally or rest should not then have terminated, a let (rule 16) shall be allowed.
(c) In all cases of doubt the referee may:
(1) ask the opinion of one or more spectators who were in a better position to see, or
(2) allow a let (rule 16), or
(3) accept the marker’s decision.
(d) The referee may appoint someone in a better position to judge the hazard side, to assist him in appeals as to where the ball dropped or fell on the hazard side, and to call faults.
(e) The referee shall not without an appeal correct any decision of the marker, and he should:
(1) see that the players change sides at the right time, and
(2) correct errors in the scoring
(a) Before commencing each set the players and/or calling of the score or of chases, when such calls are not in accordance with the decision given when the stroke or chase was scored.
(f) A let may be called by the referee at any time whenever in his opinion justice requires it.
(g) The referee has the power to order:
(1) a player who has left the court to play on or forfeit the match.
(2) a player to leave the court for any reason whatsoever, and may award the match to his opponent.

19. MARKER.

(a) In the absence of a referee the marker’s decision is final.
(b) In cases of doubt the marker may appeal to the referee, or, if there is no referee, to one or more spectators.
(c) A fault-caller may be appointed to assist the marker.

If either the marker or the fault-caller calls fault, the service is a fault, except upon appeal.
If the call of fault is reversed on appeal, that fault is annulled and a let shall be called.
If a marker is hit by the ball after it crosses the net, it shall be called “chase the line,” provided that if a referee is present and is convinced an injustice would result from such a decision, he may call a let.

20. THREE OR FOUR-HANDED GAMES. (ALSO CALLED DOUBLES).

(a) Before commencing each set, the players on the service side select the partner who is to serve. He is then the server and striker-out for his side through that game, and for alternate games throughout the set, his partner serving. Similarly the players on the hazard side then decide who is to be striker-out and server.
(b) A return of service is not good if made by the striker-out’s partner unless the ball served has struck the floor on or beyond the half court line in the service court. If striker-out’s partner touches or returns the service before it has become a fault or before it has struck the floor on or beyond the half court line, his side shall lose the point.
(c) Apart from the above, the laws for singles apply to doubles and a player and his partner are in all cases subject to the same laws as a player in singles.

HANDICAPS

21. HALF ODDS.

(a) When half odds are given, one stroke less than the full odds is given in the first and every odd game of the set, and the full odds are given in every even game (e.g., 1/2-30 means 15 in the first, third, etc., game and 30 in the second, fourth, etc., game).
(b) When half odds are owed, the full odds are owed in the odd games and one stroke less in the even games.

22. BISQUE.

The player receiving a bisque may take it to win one stroke in each set at any time subject to the following:
(a) he may not take it during a rally or rest, and
(b) if server, he may not take it after serving one fault, and
(c) if he takes it to win or to defend a chase, he may not do so before the time comes to change sides. Then, if there is only one chase, he may take it and need not change sides, or he may take it after changing sides but, after he has passed the net, he may not go back again.

If there are two chases, the players must change sides before he takes it to win or to defend either of them.

23. HALF-BISQUE.

The player receiving a half-bisque may take it:
(a) to call chase-off and so to annul a chase about to be played for, or
(b) to annul a fault served by him, or
(c) to add a second fault to one served by his opponent, or
(d) the handicapper, may give a half-bisque as being one bisque in every alternate set, in which case the bisque must be taken in the odd sets.

Apart from (b) the conditions regarding taking a bisque (rule 21) apply equally to a half-bisque.

24. CRAMPED ODDS.

Unless specifically- stated the limiting conditions of cramped odds do not apply to service.
Cramped odds may be such as are fixed by the handicapper but the more usual forms are as follows:

(a) Bar the Openings. The giver of the odds loses a stroke whenever a ball returned by him enters an opening.
(b) Bar the Winning Openings. The giver of the odds loses a stroke whenever a ball returned by him enters the dedans, the grille, or the winning gallery.
(c) Chase. When a player gives a specified chase this applies only to a chase on the service side. Any chase made by the giver of the odds worse than the one specified loses him a
stroke. Any chase made by the receiver of the odds worse than the one specified is considered equal to the one specified.
(d) Half-Court. The players shall agree or the handicapper decide to which half-court, on each side of the net, the giver of the odds shall play. He loses a stroke if a ball returned by him drops in the other half-court or in an opening or in half the dedans in the other half-court. A ball that drops on the half-court line does not lose him a stroke. After the ball has dropped the ordinary rules apply.
(e) Round Services. The striker-out may refuse to take any service that does not touch the grille penthouse. If he attempts to take such a service that service becomes good if not otherwise a fault. A service otherwise good, that does not touch the grille penthouse, is not counted a fault. A service otherwise good, that does not touch the grille penthouse, is not counted a fault.
(f) Touch no Side Walls. The giver of the odds loses a stroke if a ball in play returned by him touches the side wall, the service wall, or the main wall, or enters a gallery.
(g) Touch no Walls. The giver of the odds loses a stroke whenever a ball in play returned by him touches any wall, or enters an opening.
A ball that falls a nick is not considered to have touched the wall.
A penthouse is not a wall.
A bandeau is part of a wall.

The above odds are also given in the form that the ball must drop before touching a wall, etc., but after dropping it may touch them without penalty. In this form it is usually called “Touch no walls full pitch.”

Directions to the Marker

It is the duty of the marker:
to see that the net is at the correct height and that it remains correct;
to call faults;
to call the strokes when won or when asked to do so;
to mark the chases when scored;
to direct the players to change sides;
to call the chase or chases as the players change sides, and to call each chase before it is played for but not otherwise;
to repeat the chases;
to remove balls lying on the floor;
to keep the ball troughs replenished;
not to call “play” in the course of a rest.

RULES GOVERNING AMATEUR PLAYER STATUS

RULES GOVERNING AMATEUR PLAYER STATUS

AMATEUR PLAYER STATUS

 

Notwithstanding the Junior Player Exception and Probationary Apprentice Exception (following), USCTA rules governing amateur player status are guided by the Rules of the Tennis and Rackets Association (1998), “Amateur Status Rules, Annex A” (April, 1992).

 

1.0 Junior Player Exception

 

1.1 Purpose. The purpose of this provision is to provide limited opportunities for junior amateur players to serve as “apprentice professionals” at a court tennis club without jeopardizing their amateur status. It is intended that the limited applicability and scope of this provision will not conflict with the principle that no amateur player shall have an unfair playing advantage over another amateur player. Interpretation of USCTA rules in relation to junior amateur player status shall be made solely in the best interest of the game.

 

1.2 Player Rules. Amateur players under 23 years old may be granted approval by USCTA to serve as full-time salaried apprentice professionals at a court tennis club for a period not exceeding four months per year (or the part-time equivalent) without losing their amateur player status provided they do not:

(a) Accept additional payment for playing, coaching, or marking.

(b) Accept prize money for playing in any court tennis match.

(c) Accept appearance money for playing in any court tennis match.

(d) Accept expense money for playing in a court tennis match, competition, or exhibition, except as reimbursement for reasonable travel costs, which may be provided solely by USCTA or as, specified in Rule 1.3(b).

(e) Aggregate more than eight months of total service as an apprentice professional at one or more court tennis clubs.

 

During their term of service as an apprentice professional, junior amateur players shall enjoy all rights and privileges of amateur status. Junior amateur players who consider that any action they propose might jeopardize their amateur status shall submit particulars to USCTA for prior consideration.

 

1.3 Club Rules. Any court tennis club that engages an apprentice professional in accordance with the provisions established herein may, at its sole discretion, undertake the

following:

(a) Provide full or partial membership privileges for the apprentice professional without requiring payment for the class of membership or privileges involved, provided such membership is limited to the period during which the player is engaged as an apprentice professional.

(b) Provide reasonable expense money or other compensation as may be necessary for the apprentice professional to perform required duties and participate in club activities, including, but not limited to, accommodation, subsistence, and travel costs.

(c) Notwithstanding Rule 1.2(a), charge professional fees for time spent on court by the apprentice professional in service to the membership.

 

2.0 Probationary Apprentice Exception

 

2.1 Purpose. The purpose of this provision is to provide a limited opportunity for amateur players, regardless of age, to serve as “probationary apprentice professionals” at a court tennis club. This provision shall only apply to amateur players seriously considering a career as a court tennis professional. It is intended that the limited scope of this provision will not conflict with the principle that no amateur player shall have an unfair playing advantage over another amateur player. Interpretation of USCTA rules in relation to amateur player status shall be made solely in the best interest of the game.

 

2.2 Player Rules. Amateur players may be granted a one-time only approval by USCTA to serve as full-time probationary apprentice professionals at a court tennis club for a period not exceeding four months during which time, and for six months following termination of such service, they shall relinquish all rights and privileges of amateur status. Amateur players shall submit particulars to USCTA for prior consideration.

LOCAL RULES

LOCAL RULES

Boston:

“All white” clothing preferred.

A ball above the “out of play” board remains “in play” so long as it touches nothing

Because the top of the tambour is below the “out of play” board, a ball may hit the top edge of the tambour and still be in play.

 

Newport:

“All white” clothing preferred and mandatory in the months June through September.

A ball above the “out of play” board remains “in play” so Long as it touches nothing.

 

Prince’s Court:

“All white” clothing mandatory.

A ball above the “out of play” board remains “in play” so long as it touches nothing.

 

New York:

“All white” clothing mandatory.

A ball above the “out of play” board remains “in play” so long as it touches nothing.

 

Tuxedo:

“All white” clothing preferred.

A ball above the “out of play” board remains “in play” so long as it touches nothing.

 

Aiken:

“All white” clothing mandatory for tournaments.

A ball above the “out of play” board remains “in play” so long as it touches nothing.

 

Philadelphia:

“All white” clothing mandatory.

A ball above the “out of play” board remains “in play” so long as it touches nothing.

 

Greentree:

“All white” clothing mandatory.

A ball above the “out of play” board remains “in play” so long as it touches nothing.

 

Lakewood:

“All white” clothing preferred.

Proper court deportment is expected at all venues.